Quest Design – Expanding on the Fetch Quest Structure

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

“All quests are fetch quests,” my friend said in response to my complaints about The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. Even within the context of a post-apocalyptic world, Zelda’s NPCs always want something. People need a monster killed or a specific item gathered in exchange for a mystery item. I never gathered bundles of wood or collected fireflies for fun, I helped for the reward. We endure a lot of these trivial activities to enhance our effectiveness for later events. Without the reward, fetch quests feel like chores.

Quest design differs when developers mask the “fetch” aspect of a request. If stripped down the structure, most quests use the ABA formula: start a point A, move to point B, then return to point A. But to label all quests as “fetch quests” misses the larger point, which is the commonality in quest structure. Quests use the same structure of a fetch quest, but smart design branches from the initial goal.

 

Some quests don’t try to hide their “fetch” design

Quests in Breath of the Wild avoid any structural deviation and stay on its initial objective. One side quest revolves around Hudson, a construction worker. He builds Tarrey Town from the ground up, asking you to collect bundles of wood and search for new tenants with names ending in -son. When Hudson needs a shopkeeper, you search for someone who wants to open a store. When you recruit a new Tarrey Town citizen, Hudson then asks for wood bundles. The process repeats until he finishes the town construction.

PS4 Pro and Xbox Scorpio not Upgrading Consoles as Expected [UPDATE]

[UPDATE: 2017-03-20] PS4 Pro adds "Boost Mode" for older PS4 games

The PlayStation 4 Pro launched with clear benefits for people who owned 4K HDR televisions. For those without a 4K HDR TV, some games still performed better because of Pro developer patches. While titles like Titanfall 2 and Deus Ex: Mankind Divided performed better with Pro patches, the hardware didn’t improve all games. Patch 4.50 for the PS4 Pro adds a “Boost Mode,” which aims to improve performance for all games in the PS4 library.

The Pro’s small hardware upgrade also means a small upgrade in performance. While we won’t see games jump from 30 frames per second (FPS) to 60FPS, we will see steadier, smoother games. Although the Boost Mode tries to take advantage of the CPU and GPU, the PlayStation Blog does not guarantee improvement. Not all titles will work with the Boost Mode.

Review: Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII - New Sequel, Same Issues

Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII

Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII revolves around time. With the end of the world approaching, Lightning – the Saviour and servant of God – must save as many souls as possible. In 13 days when the time expires and the old-world ends, a new-world is reborn for the souls. The game encourages time management, yet it often wastes yours. Lightning Returns surrounds a creative battle system with fetch quests and overwritten conversations, which slow an already time restrictive structure. 

Top 5 Games of 2016

Uncharted 4: A Thief's End

Each year I play an unhealthy amount of familiar and different games. By now, I know what another Battlefield or Gears of War offers, so I avoid them. I acknowledge their quality, but I find more enjoyment from weirder, new games. I don’t hate shooters; it means one game fills the void for the duration of year. Until something knocks Halo 5: Guardians out of my Xbox, I bounce off other multiplayer shooters.

The exploration of new genres leads to unknown, uncomfortable experiences. Experimentation led me to games like Deus Ex and Mirror’s Edge, so finding their sequels on my 2016 list makes sense. My top five of 2016 lists some well known games in an unorthodox order.

2016 brought us Overwatch, Watch_Dogs 2 and other awesome games throughout the year, but you won’t find those games on my list. You’ll find what I played and loved, and games that left me disappointed.

 

Five Favourite Games from 2016

5. Inside

Insidewon’t challenge or confuse you with its puzzles, but it leaves you thinking at the end of it all. Inside’s short journey from, well, the inside, pushes you to escape from the pit of a prisonlike complex. Without any dialogue or direction, the platformer’s familiarity of “move right” provides all the information needed.

Inside

The manipulation of walking, jumping and grabbing brings the depth to exploring the dystopic world. While Inside expands on simple ideas, your character limitations stay the same. As a little boy, dogs hurt, bullets kill and falls paralyze. The controllable character stays vulnerable despite the surrounding conditions worsening closer to the outside. Inside aims for a minimalistic platformer with a predefined ruleset, yet it surprises with every new area until the very end.

 

Halo Championship Series Pro League – Fall Season Finals Recap

[Photo via ESLGaming]

A lot of talent exists outside of the Halo Championship Series (HCS) Pro League.  The Fall Season relegation bracket showed the depth of teams vying for the handful of spots in the Pro League. Despite the amount of talent, OpTic Gaming and Team EnVyUs (nV) compete from a higher pedestal. Their dominance continued throughout HCS Pro League Fall Season until game seven in the second grand finals.

 

Team EnVyUs vs. Str8 Rippin | EnVyUs win 4-0

Str8 Rippin snuck into the playoffs during the last week of the HCS Pro League. And while their playoff spot puts them among the best Halo teams, EnVyUs outclasses them in the first series.

Up 2-0 headed into game three, nV continues rolling past Str8 Rippin. Eden – Strongholds stays close early on, but spirals out of control within a few seconds. Tied at 20, Camouflage and Overshield both go over to nV. As Huke pushes with the Overshield, Camouflage keeps Snip3down alive around the catwalk. His survival stalls Str8 Rippin’s attempt at map control, while the rest of nV slays around them.  EnVyUs wins 100-21 before sweeping the series 4-0.

 

Syndicate content