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Review: BioShock Infinite - Clear Skies

A utopia, no matter how promising, will always fall. Unlike the first BioShock, in BioShock Infinite you will witness the floating city of Columbia as it descends from the perceived perfection and suffer the same fate as the underwater city of Rapture. The inevitable utopic fall represents one of the many themes throughout the game which all contribute to the believability of a society living in the sky. The gradual development of these themes builds upon the understanding of Columbia's history and current events. Irrational Games' attention to detail and their ability to imagine grand fictional worlds only compliments one of the best told stories in video games.  

Review: Dishonored - Blink, stab

I don't know if I actually enjoy stealth games. I find that whenever guards spot me trying to sneak from behind, I fall into an awkward limbo where I will either restart from my latest save, or stab everyone in the neck until I hear complete silence. Unfortunately, Dishonored doesn't change my mostly cynical opinion about the stealth genre. Dishonored's industrial, Victorian era setting fails to even compete with the highly detailed and futuristic world of Deus Ex, but it stays close to the crouch walking, throat stabbing and trap setting tactics found in the best stealth games.

Review: Borderlands 2 - A Vault not worth hunting

I believed if I collected enough junk shields and single shell shotguns that I eventually wouldn't be so bored with Borderlands 2. Only about an hour in, scepticism to whether I would even finish, let alone begin a second playthrough, already began to develop. All the positive and glowing feedback said up until and after the release, made me question whether or not I failed to see the brilliance. But I know of that brilliance - I dumped over 50 hours into the first Borderlands and all of its DLC. After 25 levels as a Siren, the unsettling familiarity and the unsatisfying reward for the patience the progression requires ruined any desire to ever play more Borderlands

Review: The Walking Dead: Episode 1 & 2 - Tough decisions

When people first spoke of Telltale's The Walking Dead, I immediately dismissed it and whatever ties I thought it had with the television show. Telltale's latest adventure game is an episodic guided narrative surrounding the idea of a zombie outbreak, which seems like the worst combination that any developer can build a game around. The AMC series is carried by a lot of action and flesh eating zombies, but the game is carried by the ethical and moral situations that require your best judgement to make multiple, increasingly difficult decisions. An emphasis on cinematics has led to many ignorantly dismissing it as another "interactive movie" as it lacks the level grinding, loot collection and combo chaining that a more traditional game has. Aside from a few annoying bugs and limited variety of traditional video game mechanics, Telltale's The Walking Dead Episode 1 and 2, provide some of the most engaging survival stories in video game form. 

Review: Mass Effect 3 - Something greater

This is the game Mass Effect fans have been waiting for. All of the time spent reading the codex and following Commander Shepard's story of the battle against the Reapers, comes to a close. What makes this trilogy different from others is the personal involvement each player has; the moral decisions they have made and the ramifications that follow. We carry over our story and character from game to game, to see how events correlate and if the decisions we have made led to the desired results. But for a new player, they don't have that connection and won't quite understand why Mass Effect 3 is such a big deal to fans. If you are part of that group that has no desire to play Mass Effect at all, there is nothing that the third instalment in the franchise will provide to change your mind.

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