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Valiant Hearts: The Great War - The Inactive Parts of War

World War I is boring. Trench warfare meant soldiers more often battled mud soaked socks and disease carrying rats, not enemy soldiers. In a battle of attrition, armies won trench warfare through continuous air attacks and cannon bombardments. Soldiers knew that no man's land, the empty space between trenches, meant death by gunfire or barbed wire. A war of attrition makes for boring video games. While waiting, no one wants to wring out socks and dig tunnels for a dozen hours. Valiant Hearts: The Great War doesn't try to show the boring, candid part of trench life, it succeeds on its own.

The German's Blitzkrieg tactic in World War II put soldiers at the front lines behind ally armour to push forward, not defend ground. Developers loved to replicate the attack and defence of major strategic points such as Carentan, France. WWII's notable fights, mobile armor and airborne attacks showed the destruction people wanted from games. A soldier's psychological erosion in the flooded trenches of WWI doesn't excite people, shooting does.

PAX East 2015 - PAX Convention Tips and Advice

Since high school I always wished to one day attend PAX East, but I always found an excuse not to go. My school's March break never lined up with PAX weekend and university essays made March the busiest time of the school year. This year I didn't care about my school schedule or whatever assignments I needed to write, I just bought my PAX Easy 2015 tickets in November and dealt with the problems as they came.

I didn't know what to expect from my first PAX or my first trip in Boston; the Toronto Fan Expo convention didn't prepare me at all. After three days in the Boston Convention Centre wandering the show floor, I learned what to avoid and how to best manage time during the show.

These PAX East tips may not help veteran PAX goers, but they really improved my weekend in Boston.


Don't stand in line to play games, it's not worth it

After waiting an hour to play the Oculus Rift only to move a few feet forward in the enormous line, I knew I only wasted my time. My advice, avoid playing anything.

Crazy, right? At a video game convention it feels like an obligation to play the games you came to see.  In reality, the lineups (outside of some indie game booths) can take hours to get through. Don't waste your time; you can participate in so many activities instead of waiting in line for three hours. I know I'm going to buy Halo 5: Guardians and Splatoon. I don't need to line up for hours to validate my purchase or satisfy my curiosity - there's just not enough time to stand around waiting.

My Top 5 Games of 2014

Every year-end I wish I played more new releases. I write a lot about video games and I find it important to expand and my knowledge and opinions on notable games, which often influences what I spend my time with. In 2014, I learned to stop caring about what games I should play and just played whatever I wanted to play. If anything, I should probably play fewer games.

I never got around to Middle Earth: Shadow of Mordor, Dragon Age: Inquisition or Destiny and I probably won't ever. I'm sure each game ranks among this year's best experiences, but you'll need to read someone else's Game of the Year list to find out exactly where.

We need refunds, not just fewer broken games

When unfinished games release with bugs or missing content even after the emerging "Day One Patch," it's not your fault or the fault of millions of other players. A person's willingness to buy makes their money the most influential part of the video game industry, yet their purchasing power doesn't make them responsible for a game's issues. I shouldn't take blame for Halo: The Master Chief Collection's matchmaking issues or Driveclub's instability because I placed a pre-order at my local retailer.

Even as developers continue to release broken games, publishers, software distributors and retailers still provide no clear avenue for people seeking refunds. Regardless of policy, they still take your money in advance. The player's discretion makes them responsible for any buyer's remorse, but I fail to see how not pre-ordering or buying games at release eventually bucks the trend of developers releasing unfinished games.

Super Mario 64 in 2014 - Playing without nostalgia

For Christmas gatherings my family always played Golden Eye 007. My older cousin set up the Nintendo 64 on a giant television shoved into the living room corner. When ready, my dad and older cousins alternated between chair and floor seats as they ran circles in each map. They never let me play. I was the five-year-old little cousin not allowed to play with the grown-ups. Those are my memories of the N64. I never owned one. I didn't play Golden Eye 007 split-screen and I didn't play Super Mario 64 with the trident controller.

I was only three-year-old when Super Mario 64 released alongside the console, yet most of my friends of the same age all retell memories of "the greatest Mario game." When I asked my dad of why he never bought me an N64, he quickly responds with, "You never asked for one." Only in high school did I start reading video game news and playing more games than available time. I spent most of my childhood away from home, staying hours past the final school bell playing basketball until sunset. I never asked for a N64 because I didn't want one.

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