DOTA 2 - My best and worst heroes

When I played League of Legends I never found a Champion I wanted to use. The weekly rotation of Champions never gave enough time to learn a single character, yet the rotation let me try each Champion. This past summer I decided to try DOTA 2. I haven't stopped playing since.

My time with League of Legends simplified the learning curve for other MOBAs like DOTA 2, yet something about the roster of Heroes made sense to me. And while I still miserably lose matches even today, I know most characters - and my best and worst. Both as an exercise to recognize my strengths and an admittance of my failures with certain Heroes, I've compiled a list of successful Heroes and Heroes I should always avoid.

 

Good Ahead, Choose Them

Earthshaker

I don't remember how I decided to play Earthshaker, but his full arsenal of stuns and low item dependence helped me setup kills for my team. Once I acquire a Blink Dagger and warp into the middle of teams to dunk my Echo Slam, I watch as my team clean up the remaining health of enemy Heroes. Earthshaker's usefulness somewhat drops off in longer matches, but my friends never complain when I select my favourite Hero.

E3 2013: A pre-show assessment

As E3 quickly approaches, it brings the near complete picture of the next generation of games. But to proclaim the official entrance into the next generation doesn't feel entirely fair considering the release of the Wii U. Even with stronger hardware, new games and a newly design controller, many people, including myself, choose to forget that Nintendo's console even exists. The slow trickle of information and void of Wii U games doesn't help either.

So as many Wii U owners sit in limbo waiting for the complete reveal of the Xbox One and PS4 launch line-ups, I wonder how Nintendo can even compete new hardware and any the opposing games capable of diverting attention away from the next Zelda.

With E3 only a few days away, I want to evaluate the current state of each console and outline what each company needs to do for the most successful E3.

Review: Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon - Housing secrets

I always wanted a sequel to Luigi's Mansion, I just can't remember why.

In December of 2001 when my father bought me a GameCube a few months before my ninth birthday, any game even close to Mario would fulfill all of my Christmas and birthday wishes. If I try to remember what I loved about Luigi's Mansion, only images of the final, ruthless boss fight and fake doors swinging open and slamming Luigi against the wall come to mind. For many new people, Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon will begin their experience with Luigi's ghost busting trips. For the veterans, Dark Moon will bring forth only facades of decade old memories.

The simple puzzles and forgiving difficulty of Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon won't sustain long durations of play, but the cleverly hidden secrets and an abundance of cheerful moments makes the exploration of each mansion a worthwhile experience for all.

Cheap Ass Games - An Interview with CheapyD

[Image Source]

David Abrams (CheapyD) manages CheapAssGamer.com - a website dedicated to tracking video game sales and prices - from his home in Tokyo, Japan. Tens of thousands of people visit Cheap Ass Gamer each day to share the latest deals available from internet and regional retailers. CheapyD also records his weekly podcast -the CAGcast- over Skype with his friends, Wombat and Shipwreck for thousands of listeners who, not only value their opinion of games, but enjoy listening to the stories they share.

               
After acquiring my history degree in Rochester, New York, I worked for a corporate video conferencing company called ADCOM who set up video conferences between people in different locations. In Canada, a more successful company with the same name sued us out of existence. My employers offered me a job for a formal position, but I quit after my 3 years with them.

I then found a job in commercial real-estate selling office buildings in Manhattan, which no one owned the exclusive rights to. Anyone could sell the office space and I would only receive pay through commission. "I hated it. I was making cold calls all day just bothering people. I'm kind of shy and I just wanted to leave people alone." I quit after a year and with no job lined up.

A cyberpunk void

I continue to look for a game that doesn't quite exist yet. I want a game where I can explore and climb the buildings a cyberpunk city (a dirty and grimy version of science fiction where even the most common man owns advanced technology) and gameplay that won't burden my time spent learning about cybernetic implants or other technology.

Deus Ex: Human Revolution comes closest to that elusive cyberpunk game that I imagine, though its confined hub-worlds and stealth mechanics represent game systems that I usually find more tedious than enjoyable.  Deus Ex's stealth enabled for many great moments when successfully bypassing an entire room of guards or even wandering the lower, dirtier half of Hengsha - a city with an entirely separate and cleaner city floating directly above. I continued to play Deus Ex: Human Revolution for the appearance, fiction and societal issues a technologically distant yet similar world, not for the gameplay itself.

While searching for a game that would offer gameplay and combat not focused on stealth, I came across Syndicate - a linear first-person corridor shooter. Unfortunately, Syndicate did not provide what I specifically looked for. I ignored the narrative and spent far too much time looking at horizon of brightly lit landscapes I would rather explore instead of the white hallways I always found myself it.

Even with the relative newness of game development in the 3D era, I did not expect such small selection within the setting. Why does such a large void exist in cyberpunk themed video games developed in the last decade? I came across a few titles that closely fit the description of an open world game, but most of them (for me at least) come with a sliver of cynicism or developmental issues.

Syndicate content