Review: Sunset Overdrive - Grind, Shoot, Bounce

Sunset Overdrive lets players enable a curse filter, and for good reason. If players expect fart jokes and the same banter between Captain Qwark and Dr. Nefarious from Ratchet & Clank, then the punk rock aesthetic and free flowing cursing might jolt long time Insomniac Games fans. Sunset Overdrive both looks and sounds different from the decades of Ratchet games, but Insomniac still retains their signature weaponry and silly characters. Sunset Overdrive's dozens of goofy weapons and extraordinary character mobility turns Sunset City into the Xbox One's deadliest playground.

The Fizco Corporation initiates an apocalypse when their Overcharge energy drink starts turning Sunset City's citizens into mutants. Fortunately for the player, the deadly orange drink eludes your lips, but now you must escape the quarantined Sunset City to survive.

Review: The Walking Dead: Season 2 - Age is not Wisdom

A prompt pops up at the start of The Walking Dead: Season 2 asking the player to import a save file from the previous game. Plot points and player actions personalize each player's story, or so Telltale claims. Yet continuity only works if the story demands it - if a story still needs an end. Season 2 needs a new set of characters and a new main character to begin a brand new story. Instead Telltale brings back 11-year-old Clementine and places her in another dysfunctional group destined to not survive. The results of the second season returns the plot to where Clementine began, making the new season an unnecessary blip in Clementine's brief lifetime.

Clementine learns a lot over the past three years and owes much of her survival to Lee's guidance and support. Even around adults, Clementine must make her own decisions and often offers better alternatives than the group leaders. Regardless of her age, Clementine fights off the strength of adult sized zombies, shoots with pin-point accuracy and persuades anyone lacking just a shred of confidence - she can do anything.

Now Playing: Day Z alpha

I always planned to wait for the complete Day Z standalone release, not buy the unfinished, buggy alpha version firmly situated in Steam's top sellers. I thought playing the alpha stage game with periodical content updates would not represent creator Dean Hall's vision of the finished Day Z game, or let alone actually resemble any sort of functioning software.

Day Z doesn't follow a linear structure driven by story or depend on specifically designed levels like a platformer. Players create their own objectives through the need to survive against the dangers of zombies, unstable health and the threat of other players. The moment you assume nothing can go wrong, something always does.

I join a night server with two other friends after planning to meet somewhere along the east coast of Chernarus. My previous character broke a leg, collapsed and died in a single second while climbing a staircase. A glitch I assumed. My other friend, Alessandro, discovered his character vanished between play sessions - a reoccurring glitch for him. My third friend, Frank, managed to escape any lethal staircases or character bugs and walked north to Alessandro's spawn point near Berezino. From a westward inland town I run east towards the rising sun where we decide to meet.

Now Playing: Need for Speed, Final Fantasy X, Battlefield 4

A break from school and a thin summer release schedule gives me plenty of time to play some older releases. But this summer I spent more time buying games then actually playing them. And since I couldn't decide which game to write a "Now Playing" feature on, I'll just compile my thoughts on each game in one post.

Need for Speed: Rivals

I planned on making Need for Speed: Rivals my PlayStation 4 launch game back in November, but buying a multiplatform game for a console launch didn't feel quite right. On launch day I changed my mind and bought Killzone: Shadow Fall instead - a game I barely remember playing.  Still curious to play Ghost Games' debut racing title, I picked up a copy for Xbox One hoping for a still thriving online community.

Unlike most racing games, Need for Speed: Rivals doesn't separate multiplayer and single player modes. In the open world, players zip past both Racers and Cops controlled by CPUs or other people. For a multiplayer-single player integrated game, Rivals rarely feels like a multiplayer game. The other five players either complete their Speedlist on the other side of the map or disappear into the safe havens to deposit their credits.  Racers can race against computers, compete in head-to-head races and beat time trials. Cop activities only slightly vary as all race types revolve around busting Racers. Racers dominate online sessions, removing the threat of ever driving into player controlled police patrols.

Review: Transistor - Plan, Not Process

As each person adventures alone in Bastion, piecing together the world with each step, a narrator watches. The narrator stays an observer, never guiding players down a path. Transistor doesn't accompany players with a narrator, but with a voice imbedded inside a sword called the Transistor. The sword's voice fills the empty air left from the voiceless main character, Red. Despite any resistance from the Transistor, Red pushes forward to unravel pieces of story neither Red nor the player can begin to form. When players learn of the the enemies called the Process, players simultaneously unravel an ambiguous, forced story wrapped around an ingenious turn-based combat system.

Syndicate content